HomeBusinessThe world's first all-terrain hypercar: Prodrive Hunter costs £1.5MILLION

The world’s first all-terrain hypercar: Prodrive Hunter costs £1.5MILLION


Frustrated that you can’t take your Ferrari to the desert or drive your Lamborghini up the side of a mountain? If this is you, there’s a new car coming to the market that will answer all your prayers.

Called the Hunter, it’s a hypercar that can tackle any terrain a driver could throw at it. It is being produced by UK specialist company Prodrive and promises ‘unrivalled ability and performance across any landscape’.

It is powered by a 600bhp 3.5-litre V6 twin-turbo engine and has a chassis and suspension setup derived from its Bahrain Raid Xtreme (BRX) Hunter T1 competition car piloted by nine-time rally champion Sebastian Loeb at this year’s Dakar Rally.

Only 25 road-going examples will be built and the colossus of a car isn’t cheap, costing from £1.5million in the UK (£1.25million before taxes).

The world’s first all-terrain hypercar: This is the new £600bhp Hunter, which is being produced by UK automotive specialist brand, Prodrive

The exclusive run of extreme hypercars will be produced at Prodrive’s headquarters in Banbury, Oxfordshire, over the next two years. 

The UK performance brand promises it will be the ‘fastest cross-country production car in the world’.

It takes the same V6 Ford engine used in the Dakar racer, which has been rebuilt and modified by the Banbury team.

While the two-seat vehicle technically qualifies as front-engined, the powerplant is set so far back in the chassis towards the cabin – which is a bid to improve stability and weigh distribution – that part of the powerplant protrudes half a metre into the cockpit. 

Only 25 road-going examples of the Prodrive Hunter will be built and the colossus of a car isn't cheap, costing from £1.5million in the UK (£1.25million before taxes)

Only 25 road-going examples of the Prodrive Hunter will be built and the colossus of a car isn’t cheap, costing from £1.5million in the UK (£1.25million before taxes)

The Hunter road car is powered by a 600bhp 3.5-litre V6 twin-turbo engine and has a chassis and suspension setup derived from its Bahrain Raid Xtreme (BRX) Hunter T1 competition car (pictured)

The Hunter road car is powered by a 600bhp 3.5-litre V6 twin-turbo engine and has a chassis and suspension setup derived from its Bahrain Raid Xtreme (BRX) Hunter T1 competition car (pictured)

The exclusive run of extreme hypercars will be produced at Prodrive’s headquarters in Banbury, Oxfordshire, over the next two years

The exclusive run of extreme hypercars will be produced at Prodrive’s headquarters in Banbury, Oxfordshire, over the next two years

The Prodrive Hunter spans 4.6 metres in length and is 2.3 metres wide. That makes it marginally shorter than a Range Rover but a tad wider - and far more competent off road

The Prodrive Hunter spans 4.6 metres in length and is 2.3 metres wide. That makes it marginally shorter than a Range Rover but a tad wider – and far more competent off road

Will it fit in my garage? Prodrive Hunter 

Price: £1.25million plus local taxes (£1.5million in UK)

Production: 25 examples

Built in: Banbury, Oxfordshire

Length: 4600mm

Width: 2300mm 

Engine: Tuned 3.5-litre Ford V6 twin-turbo 

Power: Over 600bhp

Torque: 700Nm

Drive: Permanent four-wheel drive

Transmission: Six-speed paddle shift gearbox

Differentials: Front, centre and rear differentials

Chassis: High strength steel tubular structure

Bodywork: Carbon fibre composite including recycled materials

Suspension: Double wishbone with Prodrive’s own ultra-long-travel twin-shock suspension, two adjustable dampers per wheel 

Brakes: Six pot calipers front & rear with vented discs

Wheels: 17-in forged aluminium rims with off-road tyres 

With the tweaks, Prodrive promises around 600bhp, which is actually 200bhp more than the FIA regulations allow for the rally-raid competition models. 

The engine is linked to a six-speed paddle shift gearbox which sends power to all four wheels at all times – meaning no emissions or fuel-saving switches to two-wheel-drive when the vehicle is being used in less demanding scenarios.

The British maker says it should be able to hit 62mph in less than four seconds and have a top speed of around 186mph. 

The body is closely designed on that of the racing model, which was penned by former Jaguar design boss Ian Callum, and spans 4.6 metres in length and is 2.3 metres wide.

That makes it marginally shorter than a Range Rover but a tad wider – and far more competent off road.

Platform upgrades over the racer includes improved absorption over harsh terrains from Prodrive’s own ultra-long-travel twin-shock suspension attached to a high tensile steel space frame chassis. 

It also features an FIA standard safety cage to protect occupants and has huge crash plates on the underside to spare the mechanical components when clambering across rocky terrains at pace.

The 25 road-going version will also get air jacks built in to allow for quick tyre changes when a driver is deserted in the middle of nowhere without assistance.

The wheels are bigger too, with 38-inch diameter offroad tyres wrapped around 17 inch wheels.  

But while the car is even faster and more capable than the race car, it is also more refined, Prodrive claims. 

Ian Callum has designed a new interior more in keeping with every day use over racing requirements – that sees the addition of a digital driver’s display and a centre console that houses the traditional controls found on a road car.

Platform upgrades over the racer includes improved absorption over harsh terrains from Prodrive's own ultra-long-travel twin-shock suspension attached to a high tensile steel space frame chassis

Platform upgrades over the racer includes improved absorption over harsh terrains from Prodrive’s own ultra-long-travel twin-shock suspension attached to a high tensile steel space frame chassis

It also features an FIA standard safety cage to protect occupants and has huge crash plates on the underside to spare the mechanical components when clambering across rocky terrains at pace

It also features an FIA standard safety cage to protect occupants and has huge crash plates on the underside to spare the mechanical components when clambering across rocky terrains at pace

The UK performance brand promises it will be the 'fastest cross-country production car in the world'

The UK performance brand promises it will be the ‘fastest cross-country production car in the world’

Describing the Hunter, Prodrive chairman, David Richards, said: ‘There are numerous hypercars on the market, however they all need good roads or even race tracks to show their performance. 

‘We identified that in certain parts of the world, particularly the Middle East, there are vast expanses still to be explored that go way beyond the access provided by asphalt roads. 

‘Therefore why not create a vehicle that gives the opportunity to explore these regions with performance way beyond that offered by any off-road vehicle before.’ 

While the two-seat vehicle technically qualifies as front-engined, the powerplant is set so far back in the chassis towards the cabin that part of the powerplant protrudes half a metre into the cockpit

While the two-seat vehicle technically qualifies as front-engined, the powerplant is set so far back in the chassis towards the cabin that part of the powerplant protrudes half a metre into the cockpit

Legendary Jaguar design boss Ian Callum penned its +r's display and a centre console that houses the traditional controls found on a road car.

Legendary Jaguar design boss Ian Callum penned its new interior that sees the addition of a digital driver’s display (pictured) and a centre console that houses the traditional controls found on a road car.

Pictured: Sebastien Loeb at the wheel of his BRX Prodrive Hunter T1+ during stage 8 of the Dakar Rally 2022 between Al Dawadimi and Wadi Ad Dawasir on 10 January 2022 in Wadi Ad Dawasir, Saudi Arabia

Pictured: Sebastien Loeb at the wheel of his BRX Prodrive Hunter T1+ during stage 8 of the Dakar Rally 2022 between Al Dawadimi and Wadi Ad Dawasir on 10 January 2022 in Wadi Ad Dawasir, Saudi Arabia

Richards added: ‘We took the deliberate decision to keep the Hunter Hypercar as close to the original as possible. It’s about giving owners the opportunity to experience what it is like to drive Loeb’s Dakar car across the desert, but with all the comforts of a road car and the ability to drive it from your home, through a city, to any destination of your choice.’  

All the bodywork is made from lightweight carbon fibre, which includes recycled materials produced by Prodrive’s ‘Composites’ division. This includes the winged doors, which are hinged to open up rather than outwards.

Richards said: ‘The first development vehicle is currently touring the Middle East where customers are being offered the opportunity of driving the Hunter and confirming their personal specification for production vehicles to be delivered later this year.’

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